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Title

STUDY OF IN OVO FEEDING AS AN EARLY NUTRITION METHOD IN BROILER CHICKENS

Pages

 Start Page 417 | End Page 425

Abstract

 The current study was conducted to investigate the potential effects of IN OVO FEEDING on growth performance and intestinal morphology of BROILER CHICKENS. At 16 d of incubation, 400 fertile eggs were weighed and divided into 4 treatments with 4 replicates per treatment and 25 eggs per replicate. On day 17.5 of incubation, a carbohydrate solution (including 25 g of maltose/L, 25 g of sucrose/L, 200 g of dextrin/L, and 5 g of NaCl/L) was injected into amniotic fluid of eggs in two of treatments (1 ml/egg) and other two treatments were not injected but were subjected to the same handling procedures as the injected treatments. Percentage hatchability was calculated and body weights of hatched chicks were recorded after hatch and then chicks were transferred to research farm. Two groups of injected and non-injected chicks were held for 12 h without access to feed, whereas two others (injected and non-injected groups) received feed upon arrival at the farm. At d 2 posthatch, jejunum samples were taken for morphological examination. In ovo administration of carbohydrates increased hatching weights and chick: egg weight ratio (P<0.01). In ovo injection of carbohydrates ameliorated adverse affects of delayed access to feed on breast meat (P<0.05) and thigh yield (P<0.01). Early access to feed significantly increased weight gain and feed intake during 1-21 days but not during 21-42 days. The IN OVO FEEDING treatment had no significant effects on chick weight gain and feed intake during different periods (P>0.05). Feed conversion ratio was not significantly affected by IN OVO FEEDING or early feeding treatments (P>0.05). IN OVO FEEDING significantly enhanced villus height and surface area and intestinal maltase activity at d 2 posthatch (P<0.05). Results of this study showed that in ovo administration of the carbohydrates could, to some extent compensate adverse effects of delayed access to feed, whereas IN OVO FEEDING and short time delayed access to feed had no significant effects on subsequent performance of the chicks.

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