Paper Information

Title:  THE EFFECTS OF TESTOSTERONE ON ACQUISITION OF SPATIAL WATER MAZE AND PASSIVE AVOIDANCE LEARNING TASKS
Type: POSTER
Author(s): HAROUNI E.H.,NAGHDI N.,SEPEHRI H.,ROUHANI A.H.
 
 
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2007Volume 18
 
 
Abstract: 

Introduction: Hippocampus is a major site of learning and memory formation. It has been shown that testosterone (T) receptors are expressed in CA1 region of the hippocampus. T and its metabolites have functional effects in several brain regions including CA1, and may affect learning and memory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of T receptor activation on acquisition of Morris water maze (MWM) and passive avoidance tasks.
Methods: For this purpose, adult male rats were divided in 12 groups and a week before training test were bilaterally canulated, aimed at CA1 region of hippocampus. 30 min. before training sessions, rats received vehicle (DMSO; 0.5µl/side) or different doses of T (1, 10, 20, 40, and 80 µg/0.5µl/side intra CA1) through guide canulae. In water maze paradigm, rats were trained in two blocks (each block contain 4 trials) with 5 min. interval, on day 1. On the day 2, rats performed a single probe trial in addition to a session of visible platform. In passive avoidance paradigm, rats were trained in a step-through shuttle box, by using a foot-shock (1mA; 5 sec. duration) in dark compartment. 24 h later, retrieval was tested.
Results
: Our findings were shown that T (40 µg/0.5µl) increased escape latency and distance to find hidden platform in MWM while in passive avoidance task at doses 1 and 80 µg/0.5µl reduced the step-through latency and increased the time-spent in dark chamber in compare with control groups.
Conclusion: These results suggest that T could impair acquisition of both tasks in different doses.

 
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