Paper Information

Title:  A REVIEW ON THE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION IN THE BLOOD LIPID BALANCE OF TRAFFIC POLICE PERSONNEL
Type: SPEECH
Author(s): AYAT ELAHI M.*
 
 *DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY, MEDICAL SCHOOL, YAZD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF TOXICOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGY
Date:  2004Volume 8
 
 
Abstract: 

The purpose was to evaluate the effects of urban pollution on the lipid balance of members of a municipal police force in a big city. Air pollution in urban areas is currently a serious public concern worldwide. Large population groups are affected for occupational or other reasons by exposure to often high concentrations of pollutants of a chemical nature originating from the exhaust of motor vehicles, heating plants or emissions from industrial establishments. there are many chemical agents present in the air such as noxious gases (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide), dusts of a mineral and carbonaceous type (often with traces of polycyclic hydrocarbons in from of solid) and metals dispersed in the air (lead, chromium, nickel, arsenic, vanadium and others). Some of them (lead, carbon monoxide, unsaturated chlorinated hydrocarbons, and organic solvents such as aliphatic halogenated hydrocarbons) can cause dyslipidemia.
A case – control study was conducted on 118 male police force performing traffic duties and 118 blood donors who perform office work and was paired by age and length of service. Subjects studied were aged 32–64 yr with average of 40.3±7.6 yr and length of service 2-30 yr with average of 11.5±6.6 yr. The questionnaire was completed by them in the presence of a physician for identification of possible risk factors and principal non–occupational confounding factors. All the subjects who answered in the affirmative about the questions of cardiovascular disease (CV) (documented by ECG) and previous or current liver disease including hepatitis (documented by HBV and HCV markers), family history of CV and liver disease, smokers, under 32 years of age and less than 2 years of service were eliminated. All the subjects were clinically examined which included a search for any signs of CV (heart murmurs, hypertension, and edema) and liver disease.
The comparison of the average values of HDL – cholesterol and triglycerides between two groups (control and exposed) showed significant difference. The difference in the frequency distributions of HDL cholesterol and triglycerides between two groups was also significant. The average value of total cholesterol showed insignificant difference. The averages of the values of total protein, azotemia, glycemia, creatinine, WBCS, red corpuscles and platelets showed insignificant differences. The results of urine tests were normal in both groups.
The results suggest that some chemical agents (such as carbon monoxide) contained in the urban pollution of a big city could cause dyslipidemia among people exposed to pollution and considering the following; (1) The chemical agents present in urban areas, in particular carbon monoxide have potential to cause dyslipidemia in some exposed subjects without causing symptoms. (2) The theory put forward by Mullingan which refers to the effects of pollution on the liver appears interesting and is in line with the studies are presently conducting which show liver damage in persons occupationally exposed to urban pollution. It is supposed that carbon monoxide may be responsible even at levels of exposure far lower than threshold limit values (TLV) and control could be useful to decrease the risk of atherogenic effects of carbon monoxide in asymptomatic subjects occupationally exposed to urban pollution.

 
Keyword(s): CHOLESTEROL, URBAN POLLUTION, TRAFFIC POLICEMAN
 
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