Paper Information

Title:  RECOMBINANT HEPATITIS B VACCINE
Type: POSTER
Author(s): SHOKRAEI K.*
 
 *PASTEUR INSTITUTE OF IRAN
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2007Volume 18
 
 
Abstract: 

In 2007, Pasteur Institute of Iran started the production of recombinant Hepatitis B vaccine. It is the first Iranian recombinant vaccine which is produced in a hi-tech manufacturing facility. Now Pasteur Institute of Iran can satisfy national market and also will start production of three other new recombinant products in near future. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health issue throughout the world and one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver disease. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently estimated that two billion people worldwide have evidence of hepatitis B virus exposure, and about 400 million are actively infected. Hepatitis B virus causes liver injury by an immune response against the virus-infected liver cells and is not directly cytopathic, although immunosuppressant appears to enhance replication and lead to direct cytotoxicity. Around 35-40% of Iranians have been exposed to HBV, and approximately 2-4% of them are chronic carriersn 1991, the WHO recommended that HB vaccine should be introduced into the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI). All countries were asked to introduce a program of universal immunization, either in infancy, adolescence, or both by 1997. By June 2002, 154 countries had implemented a universal hepatitis B immunization program for infants or neonates, and/or adolescents. Universal HBV vaccination of neonates was integrated into the national immunization program in Iran in 1993.The first vaccines to be licensed (1981) were plasma derived, but these have largely been replaced by recombinant derived ones which were introduced in 1986. The use of hepatitis B vaccine has been shown to reduce the incidence of new infection in many regions. A decline in the prevalence of hepatitis B infection worldwide will require changes in high-risk behavior and the wider use of vaccination. Immunization of infants against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has proved to be the most effective way to prevent infection. Hepatitis B vaccine is highly immunogenic and effective in preventing infection among children and adults, with an overall efficacy of 80-90%.

 
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