Paper Information

Title: 

EVALUATION THE EXERCISE INDUCED ASTHMA (EIA) IN PROFESSIONAL CYCLISTS

Type: SPEECH
Author(s): MAREFATI H.,RAHIMI N.,LOUNANA J.,MEDELLI J.
 
 
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2007Volume 18
 
 
Abstract: 

Aim: Asthma affecting elite athletes has been studied mainly in subjects practicing winter sports. The aim of our study was to test the pulmonary function in order to evaluate bronchial hyper-responsiveness in 37 professional cyclists with BHR+ and BHR--during the incremental test at before and after threshold ventilation.
Methods: using a questionnaire that queried the presence or absence of asthma history or common symptoms of exercise bronchospasm (EIB or EIA). Using a pneumotachograph, we recorded flow-volume curve at rest, after maximal exercise test with ambient air, and after β2-agonist inhalation, then during a metacholin challenge.
Results: in our study, 51% of the subjects showed clinical symptoms associated with bronchial responsiveness during methacholine test, a proportion which is much higher than the average population (3-20%). However, ERS-ATS pulmonary function testing criteria at rest (reduced FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FEF25-75%) were not fulfilled by any of them. There wasn’t the different significant at VO2max of the effort test in asthmatics and non asthmatics subjects (68.6±6.6 vs 66.4±5.1ml,min-1,kg-1). This remained true for submaximal loads suggesting that ventilation energy cost related to bronchial hyper-responsiveness was also higher.
Conclusion: A higher prevalence of bronchial hyper-responsiveness in the professional cyclists than the average population. The professional cyclists despite of to have the bronchial hyper-responsiveness, in reason of rehabilitation at exercise, don’t show diagnostic signs in exercise than the sedentary or asthmatic subjects. 

 
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