Paper Information

Title: 

THE EFFECT OF WATER TEMPERATURE ON THE DRINKING-INDUCED SWEATING

Type: POSTER
Author(s): ALIPOUR M.R.*,KHAMENEHEI S.,AZARFARIN M.,AHMADIASL N.,HOSSEINLOU A.,DANESHJOU N.
 
 *DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY, TABRIZ MEDICAL SCHOOL, TUMS, TABRIZ, IRAN
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2007Volume 18
 
 
Abstract: 

Drinking induced sweating is now a well known fact, but the effect of drinking water temperature on this response has not yet been studied. This constitutes the objective of the present study. After 4 hr of water deprivation, six healthy male medical students (23.7±0.6yr old, 80.7±5.7kg wt, and 181±2cm height) performed a mild exercise for 2 hr at an ambient temperature of 38-40°C and relative humidity of less than 30%. This procedure resulted in dehydration (24.3±1.2ml /kg water loss) via activations of sweating and over ventilation. Then, they were allowed to drink water with temperatures of 5, 16, 26, and 58°C in four sessions of study on separate days. Serum sodium was measured to estimate plasma osmolarity before and after heat exposure. Sweating rate was measured by weighing sweats collected from forehead area within 3 min periods, one before and the rest after drinking, up to the 18th min flowingly. Mean serum sodium concentration increased from baseline value of 144.9±0.5meq/l to 148.4±0.6meq/l following dehydration process (p<0.001). Sweating increased markedly just after drinking (p<0.01) being greater in water temperatures of 5, 58, 16 and 26°C accordingly. These results suggest that activation of oropharyngeal thermo receptors has a role to play in drinking-induced sweating and brings about a greater sweating response in 5°C and 58°C as compared to that of 16°C and 26°C.

 
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