Paper Information

Title: 

EVALUATION OF ZINGIBER OFFICINAL ETERATOGENECITY IN MICE

Type: SPEECH
Author(s): MOALEM S.A.*,NIAPOUR M.
 
 *DEPARTMENT OF TERATOLOGY, PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH CENTER, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, MASHHAD, IRAN
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF TOXICOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGY
Date:  2004Volume 8
 
 
Abstract: 

Ginger is the root part of Zingiber officinale that contains numerous ingredients including oleoresins, zingiberen, graniol, gingerol, pyrogalols, and hydroxyalkanone. It has been reported that hydroxyalkanone is responsible for the antinausea and antivomiting effect of ginger. Since this herb is used extensively as an antinausea and antivomiting agent during pregnancy, in this study, the embryotoxicity effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of ginger were evaluated, employing the standard GLP protocol for this purpose. Maximum tolerated dose of the two extracts were determined and appropriate doses were administered IP in time-pregnant mice on days six to fourteen of gestation. Embryos were harvested by caesarian section on day 18, examined externally and then stained by a microwave technique. Both extracts caused significant retardation in the weight gain of the pregnant mice and a notable reduction in uterus weight. Weight and crown-lump length of treated embryos were reduced. Both extracts caused many skeletal and tissue malformations, including limb anomalies, follicular thyroid, macrocephaly, exencephaly, kidney hypertrophy, rib anomaly and other malformations which clearly indicated the teratogenic potential of ginger extracts at administered doses. It is suggested that ginger’s reported effects on smooth muscle, leukotriens and prostaglandins synthesis could be a major factor in producing these toxicities. This plant is used extensively in traditional medicine and based on this study its use during pregnancy should be restricted until further investigations.

 
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