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Paper Information

Title: 

MORPHOLOGICAL ALTERATIONS OF TRIGEMINAL MOTOR NEURONS IN CONGENITAL HYPOTHYROIDISM

Type: POSTER
Author(s): SEPEHRI HAMID*,GANJI FARZANEH
 
 *DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY, FACULTY OF MEDICINE, GOLESTAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, GORGAN, IRAN
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2009Volume 19
 
 
Abstract: 

Appropriate TH levels are essential during the critical period of brain development, which is associated with growth of axons and dendrites and synapse formation. In rats, oral motor circuits begin to reach their adult pattern around 3 weeks after birth, the period in which alteration from sucking to biting and chewing occurs. Trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5), as the supplier of jaw muscle nerves, shows obvious developmental changes during this period. TH may have an important role in these changes. Time pregnant female rats received 50ppm propylthiouracil (PTU) in their drinking water from the 16th day of pregnancy up to the 23rd day post-partum, control group received tap water. Brain stems of 6 male 23-day old pups in each experimental group were processed for Golgi- Hortega staining method. Using rotary microtome brain stem paraffin embedded blocks were cut into 70 micron slices. Mo5 tissue sections were selected for photography and morphological analysis. The results of cell measuring and counting the primaryand secondary dendrites revealed that in hypothyroid pups beside the significantdecrease in soma size in trigeminal motor neurons, the number of secondary-but not primary dendrites- showed a significant decrease comparing to normal group. The role of thyroid hormone in motor neurons’ development and neurofilaments formation suggests that congenital hypothyroidism can alter the cell size and dendritic arborization pattern of trigeminal motoneurons.

 
Keyword(s): MOTOR NEURON, THYROID HORMONE, BRAIN DEVELOPMENT, RAT
 
 
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