Paper Information

Title: 

ORAL MORPHINE CONSUMPTION INHIBITS SPINAL CORD DEVELOPMENT IN WISTAR RAT EMBRYO

Type: POSTER
Author(s): ZANGIABADI H.*,JAFARI FATEMEH,SADOUGHI MEHRANGIZ,BAHADORAN H.,SAHRAEI HEDAYAT
 
 *DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, SHAHEED BEHESHTI UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2009Volume 19
 
 
Abstract: 

Previous studies have shown that opioid during pregnancy can lead to movement abnormalities and neurological illnesses in human beings as well as animal models. This research investigates the effect of morphine consumption by the mothers on embryonic completion of the spinal cord in Wistar Rat.
In this regard, female Wistar rats (W: 250-300 g) were studied. After mating, the test group received morphine (0.01 mg/ml) in their drinking water. Pregnant rats were anaesthetized with chloroform on the 12th, 13th and 14th days of pregnancy, and the embryos were taken out surgically. The embryos were fixed in formalin 10% for 2 weeks. Then after tissue processing, sectioning and hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining; our results indicated that thickness of the white matter layer in all three parts (frontal, posterior and lateral), the thickness of the spine's grey layer, number of grey matter substance cells and the thickness of the germinal layer on the 12th, 13th and 14th of the embryonic days, decreased significantly in comparison with the control group. The length of the ependimal duct was increased which suggests a delay in completion of the duct.
In conclusion, morphine consumption during pregnancy causes defects in growth and completion of the spine. This can prove the destructive role of morphine consumption in completion of the spinal cord as one of the most important neural centers.

 
Keyword(s): DEVELOPMENT SPINAL CORD, WHITE MATTER, GREY MATTER, EPANDIMAL DUCT, MORPHINE
 
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