Paper Information

Title: 

OLIVE (OLEA EUROPAEA L.) LEAF EXTRACT ATTENUATES HIGH GLUCOSE-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN PC12 CELLS

Type: POSTER
Author(s): KAYEDI A.*,ESMAEILI MAHANI SAEID,SHEYBANI VAHID,HAJI ALIZADEH Z.,RASOULIAN B.,ABBASNEZHAD MAHDI
 
 *DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY, FACULTY OF SCIENCES, SHAHID BAHONAR UNIVERSITY OF KERMAN, KERMAN, IRAN
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2009Volume 19
 
 
Abstract: 

Cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells die through programmed cell death when exposed to elevated glucose, providing an in vitro model for investigation of the mechanisms leading to diabetic neuropathy. Hyperglycemia in animal and in vitro models of diabetes activates superoxide overproduction by the mitochondrial electron transfer chain that is implicated in the development of neuropathy. Since olive leaves extract (OLE) has been recommended in the literature as a remedy for the treatment of diabetes and also it contains antioxidant agents, we decided to investigate its effects on high-glucose-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. We found that elevation of glucose (100 mM~4 times that of normal) sequentially increased functional cell damage and caspase-3 activation, leading to cell death as assessed by MTT assay and immunobloting. Incubation of cells (24 and 48h) with different doses of OLE (100, 200, 400 and 600μg/ml) had no effect on cells. 24 h co-treatment of cells with OLE and 100mM glucose showed that 400μg/ml of OLE could significantly protect the cells from high glucose-induced apoptosis (P<0.01). In contrast, 48 h incubation of different doses of OLE had no effect on high glucose-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, OLE has a protective effect on PC12 cell damage induced by high glucose, and its effect depends on glucose incubation time.

 
Keyword(s): HIGH GLUCOSE, APOPTOSIS, PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELL, OLIVE LEAF EXTRACT
 
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