Paper Information

Title:  EFFECTS OF AQUEOUS EXTRACTS OF GARLIC AND PEGANUM HARMALA ON MOTOR ASYMMETRY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN AN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE IN MALE RATS
Type: POSTER
Author(s): ZIAEI S.A.*,NASRI SIMA,SALAR FARIBA,REZAEI MARYAM,ROGHANI MEHRDAD,KAMALINEZHAD MOHAMMAD,GOUDARZVAND M.,GHOLAMI OMID
 
 *DEPARTMENT PHARMACOLOGY, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, SHAHID BEHESHTI UNIVERSITY, TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Name of Seminar: IRANIAN CONGRESS OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Type of Seminar:  CONGRESS
Sponsor:  PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY SOCIETY, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE
Date:  2009Volume 19
 
 
Abstract: 

Superoxides formation is one of the main etiologies of Parkinson’s disease, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are able to suppress superoxide formation. Allium sativum and Peganum harmala are ACE inhibitors and considered for this purpose in an experimental model of Parkinson’s disease in male rats.
Male rats (n=33) were divided in 5 groups: Sham, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere SNC), Allium sativum, Peganum harmala aqueous extracts (10 mg/kg) and captopril. Garlic, Peganum harmala and captopril were injected i.p. 7 days before and 3 days after 6-hydroxydopamine injection. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine test, brain protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation as well as serum and brain ACE activity were assayed in all groups.
Rotation test with apomorphine in captopril (21.4 ±10.5), garlic (21.5± 6.3) and Peganum harmala (10.0± 1.9) groups were significantly lower than neurotoxin group (194 ±57.7). Lipid peroxidation in captopril was significantly lower than neurotoxin (p=0.013) .Captopril, garlic and Peganum harmala all inhibited serum ACE activity respectively, but garlic inhibited brain ACE too. Allium sativum and Peganum harmala aqueous extracts have anti oxidant effects and are useful in Parkinson’s disease treatment.

 
Keyword(s): PARKINSON’S DISEASE, 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE, GARLIC, PEGANUM HARMALA, ACE
 
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