Paper Information

Journal:   JOURNAL OF ADVANCES IN MEDICAL EDUCATION & PROFESSIONALISM   APRIL 2018 , Volume 6 , Number 2; Page(s) 78 To 85.
 
Paper: 

USING NEWLY DECEASED PATIENTS IN TEACHING CLINICAL SKILLS: ITS ETHICAL AND EDUCATIONAL CHALLENGES

 
 
Author(s):  SABER MAHBOOBEH, ENJOO SEYED ALI, MAHBOUDI ALI, TABEI SEYED ZIAADIN*
 
* MEDICAL ETHICS DEPARTMENT, MEDICAL SCHOOL, SHIRAZ UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, SHIRAZ, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Introduction: The newly deceased patients have long been used in medical schools to teach clinical skills without any challenges as it helps to train skilled doctors. Nowadays, the use of moulages and simulators are common in teaching clinical skills since these tools provide the opportunity for frequent practice without any pain and injury.
There are specific procedures which still require the use of cadavers. However, the increased significance of patient rights has generally challenged the practicality of using the deceased bodies for this purpose. This study was designed with the aim of determining to what extent clinical skill training is dependent on the recently deceased patients.
Methods: This was a cross-sectional mixed-method triangulation design conducted in two phases. In the first phase, a researcher-made questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data of the medical students and residents. The data were used to assess the frequency of experience. In the second stage, semi-structured interviews were conducted with faculty members and fellows in order to evaluate the educational impact of this type of procedure and the influential factors. The quantitative data were analyzed using statistical software, and the qualitative codes were extracted following a content analysis. Finally, a comparative analysis was performed.
Results: Twenty five residents (26%) and seven medical students (14%) had the experience of performing procedures on the recently deceased patients for training purposes. About half of the residents and 33% of the medical students had observed their colleagues practicing procedures on cadavers. In the qualitative phase, the main categories included professional ethics, law and educational requirements.
Conclusion: A relatively low number of medical students and residents had experienced procedures on the newly deceased patients. In this regard, ethical, religious and legal concerns might have played a part despite the desire to learn. It would be effective to direct these educational experiences toward procedures that cannot be mastered through moulages and simulators, and to lay the legal and executive ground so that performing these procedures under the supervision of professors, and with a level of documentation would have no legal challenges.

 
Keyword(s): CADAVER, LEARNING, CLINICAL SKILLS, ETHICS
 
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