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Paper Information

Journal:   JOURNAL OF ISLAMIC ECONOMIC STUDIES   FALL 2015-WINTER 2016 , Volume 8 , Number 1 (15) ; Page(s) 27 To 56.
 
Paper: 

THE FIQHI POSSIBILITY OF USING BAY AL-DAYN SUKUK AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR THE IRANIAN CENTRAL BANK MUSHARAKAH PAPERS

 
 
Author(s):  MOUSAVIAN SAYYED ABBAS, NADRI KAMRAN, MEISAMI HOSSEIN*
 
* 
 
Abstract: 

Reviewing the Imamiah Fiqh bases in the issue of Bay Al-Dayn, this paper tries to discuss the possibility of securitizing the debts that the Iranian government and banks owe the central bank. In addition, it tries to find out the principals that should be paid attention to in designation and usage of the Bay Al-Dayn Sukuk to conduct monetary policies. Using the content analysis and Ijtehad approach, the results show that because of the fact that there is a united ownership between government, Public banks and central bank (in other words, the Public banks and central bank are part of the government and not an independent entity), the debts that the government itself or the Public banks owe the central bank cannot be securitized. However, it is not the case when it comes to the debts of private banks to the central bank and hence they can be securitized using Bay Al-Dayn. Therefore, the first and second market for these kinds of securities are both permissible. Based on the research findings, it can be claimed that the Bay Al-Dayn Sukuk is a very suitable instrument to securitize the private banks debts to the central bank. The rationale behind this is that the structure of the Bay Al-Dayn Sukuk is very simple, costless and it does not need any transform of physical tangible goods between Sukuk stakeholders. Nevertheless, because of the limitations this instrument has, it could not be used to securitize the debts that government itself or the Public banks owe the central bank.

 
Keyword(s): BAY AL-DAYN, SUKUK, CENTRAL BANK, MONETARY POLICY, ISLAMIC BANKING
 
References: 
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