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Paper Information

Journal:   IRANIAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY   JULY 2016 , Volume 13 , Number 3; Page(s) 0 To 0.
 
Paper: 

PREOPERATIVE GRADING OF ASTROCYTIC SUPRATENTORIAL BRAIN TUMORS WITH DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND APPARENT DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT

 
 
Author(s):  RAISI NAFCHI MAHSA, FAEGHI FARIBORZ*, ZALI ALIREZA, HAGHIGHATKHAH HAMIDREZA, JALAL SHOKOUHI JALAL
 
* DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY TECHNOLOGY, SCHOOL OF ALLIED MEDICAL SCIENCES, SHAHID BEHESHTI UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Background: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on measuring the random Brownian motion of water molecules within the biological tissues and is particularly useful in tumor characterization.
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of DW MRI and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for preoperative grading of astrocytic supratentorial brain tumors.
Patients and Methods: Twenty-three patients (14 females, 9 males, mean age 43 years) with astrocytic supratentorial brain tumors underwent preoperative conventional MR imaging and DWMRI. The minimum, maximum and mean ADC values and them inimum, maximum and mean DWI signal intensities of each tumor were taken by placing several regions of interest in the tumor on DWI images and ADC maps. To assess the relationship between these values and the tumor grade, we used the Mann-Whitney U test and the Spearman correlation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the cutoff value of the minimum, maximum and mean ADC values and the minimum, maximum and mean DWI signal intensities that had the best composition of sensitivity and specificity for differentiating low-grade and high-grade astrocytic brain tumors.
Results: According to the pathology reports, 10 patients had low-grade astrocytomas (grades I, II) and 13 patients had high-grade astrocytomas (grades III, IV). The minimum ADC value showed a significantly inverse correlation with astrocytic tumor grade (P= 0.006). The correlation between the maximum ADC value and the maximum DWI signal intensity with tumor grade was direct (P= 0.013, P=0.035). According to the ROC analysis, the cutoff values of 0.843×10-3mm2/s, 2.117×10-3mm2/s and 165.2 for the minimum ADC, maximum ADC and maximum DWI respectively, obtained the best combination of sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas.
Conclusion: Measuring minimum ADC, maximum ADC and maximum DWI signal intensity can provide valuable information for grading of astrocytic supratentorial brain tumors before surgery.

 
Keyword(s): DIFFUSION MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING, DIFFUSION WEIGHTED MRI, CEREBRAL ASTROCYTOMA, NEOPLASM GRADING, TUMOR GRADING
 
 
References: 
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Click to Cite.
APA: Copy

RAISI NAFCHI, M., & FAEGHI, F., & ZALI, A., & HAGHIGHATKHAH, H., & JALAL SHOKOUHI, J. (2016). PREOPERATIVE GRADING OF ASTROCYTIC SUPRATENTORIAL BRAIN TUMORS WITH DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND APPARENT DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT. IRANIAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, 13(3), 0-0. https://www.sid.ir/en/journal/ViewPaper.aspx?id=569375



Vancouver: Copy

RAISI NAFCHI MAHSA, FAEGHI FARIBORZ, ZALI ALIREZA, HAGHIGHATKHAH HAMIDREZA, JALAL SHOKOUHI JALAL. PREOPERATIVE GRADING OF ASTROCYTIC SUPRATENTORIAL BRAIN TUMORS WITH DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND APPARENT DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT. IRANIAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY. 2016 [cited 2021May11];13(3):0-0. Available from: https://www.sid.ir/en/journal/ViewPaper.aspx?id=569375



IEEE: Copy

RAISI NAFCHI, M., FAEGHI, F., ZALI, A., HAGHIGHATKHAH, H., JALAL SHOKOUHI, J., 2016. PREOPERATIVE GRADING OF ASTROCYTIC SUPRATENTORIAL BRAIN TUMORS WITH DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND APPARENT DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT. IRANIAN JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY, [online] 13(3), pp.0-0. Available: https://www.sid.ir/en/journal/ViewPaper.aspx?id=569375.



 
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