Paper Information

Journal:   RESEARCHER BULLETIN OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (PEJOUHANDEH)   2003 , Volume 8 , Number 2 (32); Page(s) 99 To 104.
 
Paper: 

SURVEYING THE EFFICACY OF EXTENDED GROIN-THORACOLUMBAR FLAP IN RECONSTRUCTION OF UPPER EXTREMITY SOFT TISSUE DEFECTS

 
 
Author(s):  HASSANPOUR E., LOGHMANI SH.*
 
* 
 
Abstract: 

Backgrounds: Regarding the prevalence of upper extremity injuries and soft tissue defects and problems occurred following reconstruction through conventional methods such as skin graft, local flaps, and distant flaps, the present study was conducted to determine the efficacy of extended groin-thoracolumbar flap in reconstruction of upper extremity soft tissue defects in patients referring to 15 Khordad Hospital, during the academic years of 1996-2001.
Materials and methods: This clinical trial of quasiexperimental type has been carried out on 6 patients suffering from extensive upper extremity soft tissue defect. Flap length was within the 25-41 cm range. We have surveyed the efficacy of flap in covering the extensive defect, appearance of the tissue, duration of surgery, patient's hospitalization and complications.
Results: The study population included 2 females and 4 males with the mean age of 25.8±8.6 years. The mean flap size was 388.7±80.4 cm2. Lesions were caused by trauma in 3 cases and burning in the remaining 3 cases. The mean operation time was 80 minutes for the first stage and 35 minutes for the second stage. For all cases the operation was successfully achieved and flap necrosis was not present in any case.
Conclusion: Extended groin-thoracolumbar flap is a useful alternative for upper limb coverage. Flaps of 12×41cm size could be successfully used for this procedure. This flap can cover very large defects, meanwhile, the operation is safe and simple, and less time-consuming. Donor site morbidity is minimal.

 
Keyword(s): EXTENDED GROIN - THORACOLUMBAR FLAP, UPPER EXTREMITY SOFT TISSUE DEFECT
 
References: 
  • ندارد
 
  Persian Abstract Yearly Visit 0
 
Latest on Blog
Enter SID Blog