Paper Information

Journal:   GEOSCIENCES   Fall-Winter 2004 , Volume 11 , Number 49-50; Page(s) 2 To 13.
 
Paper: 

ACTIVE TECHNOTIC IN WEST OF THE SHOTORI MOUNTAIN RANGE

 
 
Author(s):  NAVAB POUR P., SAEEDI A., GHASSEMI M.R.
 
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Abstract: 

The Shotori mountain range at northern end of the Nayband active fault is one of the east central Iranian ranges in east of Tabas city and playa. Old alluvial cyclic stream terraces and buried Quaternary fault scarps in western mountain front area, and three kind of old, braided, and active alluvial fans in Tabas plain are witnesses to mountain neotectonic uplift, westward migration of Quaternary sedimentation, and eastward movement of retrograde erosion along seasonal rivers. Ancient perched caves and qanats in alluvial valley slopes present the speed of deep erosion.
Outcropped Neogene anticlines, old erosional terraces, meandring antecedent river gorges, and warping of the old fans in Tabas plain all point to periodic active uplift of the plain with respect to the playa. Geomorphic indices, such as knickpoints in longitudinal river profile, valley width/heigth ratio, and mountain front sinuosity show that the active tectonic movements are due to the Quaternary faults in the Tabas plain and along northern and southern parts of the moimtain front, but the middle front seems to be inactive in the present time.
Meanwhile, the 1978 earthquake of Tabas (Ms=7.3) after an 11-century seismic gap is a proof to the active westward migration of the deformational front. In this way, the close relationships between the tectonic geomorphology of the area and the seismotectonics of the recent earthquake led us to introducing relic, inactive, active, and new-born mountain fronts in the area; and the role of such studies in better undrestanding of activity and seismicity history of regions is emphasized.

 
Keyword(s): ACTIVE TECTONICS, QUATERNAVY GEOLOGY, GEOMORPHIC INDICES, TABAS, SHOTORI MOUNTAIN RANGE, IRAN
 
References: 
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