Paper Information

Journal:   GEOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH QUARTERLY   Spring 2003 , Volume 35 , Number 44; Page(s) 1 To 10.
 
Paper: 

ALLUVIAL FANS MORPHOLOGY AS A FACTOR FOR TECTONIC ACTIVITIES ASSESSMENT, THE CASE STUDY: ALLUVIAL FANS OF NORTHERN SLOPE OF MISHO- DAGH MOUNTAIN (AZERBAIJAN- IRAN)

 
 
Author(s):  KHAYYAM M., MOKHTARY KOSHKY D.
 
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Abstract: 

Misho- Dagh mountain is Located in the north of Oromieh lake in northwest of Iran. The Marand Plain (EW trending) is situated in the north of Misho- Dagh mountaineus area. Northern Misho oblique fault and its branches have the most important role on morphology of northern slope of Misho- Dagh and its mountaineus front that is overlook on Marand plain.
The vertical movements of several major faults effect on catchments. Also, in this area, the alluvi fans distribution and evolution have been effected by vertical movements of major faults.
The creation of segmented and telescopic alluviai fans, folding of early Quternary sediments is due to tectonic activities. The active Part of alluvial fans in eastern Misho are located on their heads and in western Misho this parts are situated on their sides and lower Parts, That indicate the different of tectonic activities on tow parts of Misho. The careful study of isoheapses form on alluvial fans indictate that on easthern Misho and some of western Misho alluvial fans, there is no effects of tectonic activities. Isoheapses are fornmed a part of a circle, and Alluvial fans heads be applicable to the center of circles. On the rest of western Misho alluvial fans, isoheapses are formed a part of a ellipse that indicated a elongation due to tectonic effects. It can concluded that the role of tectonic activities in eastern Misho effects the mountain front and in western Misho the surface of alluvial fans. Therefore, It is possible to use the morphology of alluvial fans as a indicator on the assessment of tectonic activities.

 
Keyword(s): TECTONIC ACTIVITY, MORPHOLOGY, ALLUVIAL FAN, MISHO-DAGH, IRAN
 
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