Paper Information

Journal:   INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL HOSPITAL RESEARCH   2015 , Volume 4 , Number 4; Page(s) 183 To 188.
 
Paper: 

INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE DAMAGE RELATED TO MANDIBULAR ADVANCEMENT BY SAGITTAL SPLIT OSTEOTOMY

 
 
Author(s):  POORIAN BEHNAZ*, MOHAJERANI HASAN
 
* DEPARTMENT OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, DENTAL SCHOOL, SHAHID BEHESHTI UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Background and Objectives: Split sagittal osteotomy is a common operation that may induce inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) damage, potentially leading to sensory deficit, numbness, and pain. Investigations in Iran to evaluate the adverse effects of sagittal split osteotomy surgery are rare so questions have been raised about the success rate of operation and the frequency of unwilling outcome. To address these concerns, we conducted a prospective study evaluating the rate of IAN damage related to mandibular advancement by sagittal split osteotomy in Iranian population.
Methods: In this prospective study, 66 patients including 30 men (45.4%) and 36 women (54.5%) with Class II malocclusion and mandibular retrognathism who were undergoing mandibular advancement surgery (SSO) were recruited during 2013-2015. All patients were followed for one year after surgery. Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare the categorical variables, and the numerical variables were compared by t-test. P<0.05 was considered as the significance level.
Findings: The study sample had a mean age 32.3±12.04. The rate of nerve disturbance was 75.8%. Yet, 78.9% of the patients were satisfied with the results of the surgery.
Conclusions: Our study indicated that IAN disturbance after split sagittal surgery is frequent in Iran. This situation indicates the need for caution on considering split sagittal surgery as a safe medical technique.

 
Keyword(s): INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE (IAN), SAGITTAL SPLIT OSTEOTOMY, NEUROSENSORY DAMAGE, PATIENT SAFETY
 
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