Paper Information

Journal:   IRANIAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY (IJP)   SPRING 2016 , Volume 11 , Number 2; Page(s) 89 To 96.
 
Paper: 

THE DIAGNOSIS OF HIV INFECTION IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

 
 
Author(s):  ABDOLLAHI ALIREZA*, SAFFAR HANA
 
* KESHAVARZ BLVD, IMAM HOSPITALS COMPLEX, TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

It is estimated that the number of HIV infected children globally has increased from 1.6 million in 2001 to 3.3 million in 2012. The number of children below 15 years of age living with HIV has increased worldwide. Published data from recent studies confirmed dramatic survival benefit for infants started anti-retroviral therapy (ART) as early as possible after diagnosis of HI. Early confirmation of HIV diagnosis is required in order to identify infants who need immediate ART. WHO has designed recommendations to improve programs for both early diagnoses of HIV infection and considering ART whenever indicated? It is strongly recommended that HIV virologocal assays for diagnosis of HIV have sensitivity of at least 95% and ideally greater than 98% and specificity of 98% or more under standardized and validated conditions.
Timing of virological testing is also important. Infants infected at or around delivery may take short time to have detectable virus. Therefore, sensitivity of virological tests is lower at birth. In utero HIV infection, HIV DNA or RNA can be detected within 48 h of birth and in infants with peripartum acquisition it needs one to two weeks. Finally it is emphasized that all laboratories performing HIV tests should follow available services provided by WHO or CDC for quality assurance programs. Both clinicians and staffs providing laboratory services need regular communications, well-defined SOPs and nationally validated algorithms for optimal use of laboratory tests. Every country should use assays that have been validated by national reference laboratory.

 
Keyword(s): DIAGNOSIS, HIV INFECTION, INFANTS, CHILDREN
 
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