Paper Information

Journal:   JOURNAL OF HEALTH EDUCATION AND HEALTH PROMOTION   SPRING 2016 , Volume 4 , Number 1; Page(s) 74 To 81.
 
Paper: 

PREDI CATION OF COMPLIANCE TO STANDARD PRE CAUTIONS AMONG NURSES IN EDUCATIONAL HOSPITALS IN ZAHEDAN BASED ON HEALTH BELIEF MODEL

 
 
Author(s):  MASOUDI GHOLAM REZA, KHASHEI VARNAMKHASTI FARIBA*, ANSARI MOGADAM ALIREZA, SAHNAVAZI MADINEH, BAZI MOHAMMAD
 
* ZAHEDAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, ZAHEDAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

back ground and o b je c t iv e: standard precautions are a proper strategy for prevention of occupational diseases among nurses. the study was aimed to investigate the application of standard precautions for prevention of transmission of hepatitis b and c and hiv in educational hospitals.
materials and methods: in this cross-sectional study 218 nurses, 174 female and 44 male, of two educational hospitals in zahedan, iran uses multi-stages sampling method were studied. a polychotomy standard questionnaire including demographic questions and health belief model constructs were used to gather the data. the participants responded to questions via self-report method. through spss 16 and using descriptive (percentage, mean) and analytical (paired t test, independent t test, pearson correlation coefficient, and linear regression coefficient) statistics the data were analyzed.
results: the mean age of the precipitants was 31.73±6.28.only 27.7% of nurses had a good level of knowledge and 23.9, 63.3 and 13.8% of them had good, average and weak level of practice, respectively. also results of liner regression showed that perceived barrier and self-efficacy predicted the 23.5% of predictive behaviors variances.
conclusion: health belief model is a proper framework for designing and implementing the educational interventions in promoting the predictive behaviors of hepatitis and aids in hospitals.

 
Keyword(s): HEALTH BELIEF MODEL, STANDARD PRECAUTIONS, NURSE, HEPATITIS, ZAHEDAN
 
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