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Paper Information

Journal:   IRANIAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY (IJP)   FALL 2013 , Volume 8 , Number 4; Page(s) 209 To 218.
 
Paper: 

PREVALENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY OF BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM SURGICAL SITE AND BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS OF HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS AT A TERTIARY HEART CENTER

 
 
Author(s):  SOTOUDEH ANVARI MARYAM*, BOROUMAND MOHAMMAD ALI, AMELIMOJARAD ELHAM, NOSRATI MARJANEH, MORADI NEDA, GOODARZYNEJAD HAMIDREZA
 
* TEHRAN HEART CENTER, KAREGAR SHOMALI ST., TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Background and Objectives: Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSIs) and surgical site infections (SSIs) are among the most common nosocomial infections with high mortality and morbidity. We aimed to evaluate the frequency of various species among BSIs and SSIs at Tehran Heart Center, Tehran, Iran.
Methods: Patients with localized or systemic infections that became evident 48 hours or more after hospitalization were included. Data were prospectively collected in 4 intensive care units (ICUs), 5 cardiac care units (CCUs), 7 post-CCUs, and 5 surgical wards during two consecutive years in 2008 and 2009. Approximately 18414 coronary angiography and 7393 open-heart surgeries were done within this period. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines.
Results: Among 212 detected patients with SSI and/or BSI in the year 2008, 138 had hospital acquired infection (HAI) and 74 had non–HAI while these figures for 2009 was 165.270 and 105.270, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus (21.5%) and Entrobacter spp. (16.5%) were two most common pathogens responsible for hospital acquired BSIs while S. aureus (20.6%) and S. epidermidis (20.6%) were corresponding isolates responsible for community acquired BSIs. Staphylococcus aureus (53.3%) and Escherichia coli (11.0%) were the two most common pathogens responsible for hospital acquired SSIs in the year 2008, while S. aureus (49.0%) and S. epidermidis (11.0%) were the most frequently reported hospital acquired SSIs in 2009.
Conclusions: Making rational decisions about hospital infection control plans may reduce infection rates for bacteria with antimicrobial resistance.

 
Keyword(s): PREVALENCE, NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS, SURGICAL WOUND INFECTION, MICROBIAL SENSITIVITY TEST
 
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