Paper Information

Journal:   JOURNAL OF MEDICAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT   FALL 2014 , Volume 7 , Number 15; Page(s) 10 To 21.
 
Paper: 

A STUDY ON THE PREDICTING FACTORS OF INTENDED E-LEARNING AMONG FACULTY MEMBERS BASED ON THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR

 
 
Author(s):  BASHIRIAN S., JALILIAN F., BARATI M.*, GHAFARI A.
 
* RESEARCH CENTER FOR BEHAVIRAL DISORDERS AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE, HAMADAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, HAMADAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Background and Objective: Nowadays, E-learning is one of the most advanced educational techniques. It is, therefore, important to identify aspects and related factors of e-learning among faculty members. This study used Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to examine factors related to using of e-learning method.
Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out on 200 faculty members of Hamadan who were recruited with a stratified sampling method. The data-gathering tool consisted of a questionnaire based on the TPB constructs and demographic variables whose reliability and validity were approved by the experts. Data were analyzed using t-test, One-way ANOVA and Logistic regression SPSS-16 software.
Results: The subjects received 52.3%, 49.5% and 61.5% of the scores for attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavior control, respectively. Among our samples, 42.5% indicated that they have no intention to use e-learning in the future. Also, attitude and perceived behavioral control were the best predictors for behavioral intention in the theory of planned behavior.
Conclusion: Results demonstrated the poor motivation of faculty members toward e-learning. Therefore, it is recommended to implement educational intervention using the theory of planned behavior with emphasis on attitude and perceived behavioral control as facilitators of the adoption of e-learning in further education programs.

 
Keyword(s): E-LEARNING, FACULTY MEMBERS, MEDICAL EDUCATION, BEHAVIORAL INTENTION
 
References: 
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