Paper Information

Journal:   INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FERTILITY AND STERILITY   SUMMER 2011 , Volume 5 , Number SUPPLEMENT 1; Page(s) 58 To 59.
 
Paper: 

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND ETHICS: THE ASSOCIATION OF INFERTILE COUPLES’ SOCIO-CULTURAL BELIEFS WITH THEIR INTENTION TO USE DONATION PROCEDURES FOR ASSISTED REPRODUCTION

 
 
Author(s):  LATIFNEJAD ROUDSARI R.*, JAFARI H., TAGHIPOUR A., KHADEM N., EBRAHIMZADEH S.
 
* NURSING AND MIDWIFERY SCHOOL, MASHHAD UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCE, MASHHAD, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Background: In the last decade the increasing use of assisted reproductive technologies in Iran continue to raise moral, ethical, cultural and legal questions for scientists, authorities and the public. A few researches has been conducted in this field. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the association of infertile couples’ socio-cultural beliefs with their intention to make use of donation procedures for assisted reproduction in Mashhad, Iran.
Materials and Methods: This corelational study was carried out on 85 infertile couples (85 male/ 85 female) that were selected using convenience sampling from Montaserieh Infertility Research Center in Mashhad. Socio-cultural beliefs including 5 subscales in relation to childbearing methods, social recognition of infertility, social identity, religious beliefs and social support and also couples’ intention to use donation procedures were measured using valid (
a=0.887) and reliable self-structured questionnaires. Data were analyzed using statistical tests including t test, Mannwhitney and Pearson’ correlation coefficient.
Results: The mean score of socio-cultural beliefs in infertile women and men was 67.1 ± 11.8 and 65.7 ± 12.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between socio-cultural beliefs of infertile women and men. The highest score of socio-cultural beliefs in infertile men and women was related to the subscale of ‘social support’ (84.7 ± 14.5 vs. 86.2 ± 14.6) and the lowest to the ‘social recognition of infertility’ (60.0 ± 18.7 vs. 59.2 ± 18). There was a direct correlation between infertile women’s (p<0.005) and men’s (p<0.000) socio-cultural beliefs and their intention to use donation procedures. The mean score of women’s socio-cultural beliefs with intention was higher than women’s with no intention. Similarly, men with intension to use donation procedures had a higher score of socio-cultural beliefs. There was also a direct correlation between socio-cultural beliefs and knowledge of infertile women (p<0.000, r=0.379) and men (p<0.000, r=0.437) regarding donation procedures.
Conclusion: These findings suggest that social-cultural beliefs need to be taken into consideration thoroughly, in order to create an appropriate atmosphere for social recognition of using donation procedures. Alteration of social-cultural beliefs related to infertility at the community level may encourage infertile men and women to use donation procedures with more ease and without being surrounded by strain and fear of the wrong beliefs.

 
Keyword(s): SOCIO-CULTURAL BELIEFS, INTENTION, DONATION PROCEDURES
 
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