Paper Information

Journal:   VETERINARY CLINICAL PATHOLOGY (VETERINARY JOURNAL TABRIZ)   SPRING 2010 , Volume 4 , Number 1 (13); Page(s) 765 To 771.
 
Paper: 

A SERVEY ON THE PREVALENCE RATE OF LINGUATULA SERRATA IN STARY DOGS OF THE CITY OF URMIA

 
 
Author(s):  RASOLI S.*, AMNIATTALAB A., SADAGIAN M., HAJI KARIMLO B., AZIZPOUR SARIJEH A., JAFARI KAMAL
 
* FACULTY OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, ISLAMIC AZAD UNIVERSITY-URMIA BRANCH, URMIA, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Linguatla serrata is a zoonotic parasite which causes different forms of liguatulosis in humans, carnivores and ruminants. The most important way of human infection is injection of vegetables, fruits and water contaminated by parasite eggs and through nasal and oral secretions and feces of carnivorous especially stray dogs. Also, consumption of raw and under cook meat of sheep, goats, cattle and other herbivores is another risk factor in human infection by Linguatla serrata.  This study was conducted in order to determine the infection rate of dogs by Linguatla serrata in the city of Urmia. In the present study, 37 dogs including 22 male and 15 female animals from different parts of the city were studied. The frontal sinuses, nasal turbinates, brain cavity, nasopharynx and eustachian tubes were examined for adult Linguatla serrata. The recovered parasites were fixed in 10% formalin solution, cleared by lactophenol and stained with azocarmin. Thirty of the studied dogs (81.01%) were infected by Linguatla serrata. The results indicated that body weight, age, sex and geographical locations had no significant effect in the prevalence rate of the parasite. The number of parasites recovered from each dog ranged from 1 to 7 with an average of 2.93 in each dog. The length of the mature linguatula varied from 35-50 mm in females and 2-18 mm in males. The greatest number of parasites was found in the cranial part of the frontal sinus with 7 parasites.

 
Keyword(s): LINGUATULA SERRATA, STRAY DOGS, URMIA
 
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