Paper Information

Journal:   DYNAMIC AGRICULTURE   FALL 2008 , Volume 5 , Number 3 (AGRONOMY); Page(s) 339 To 348.
 
Paper: 

CHANGES IN YIELD AND YIELD COMPONENTS OF CANOLA CULTIVARS (BRASSICA NAPUS L.)IN DIFFERENTS PLANTING DATE IN SALTY SOILS

 
 
Author(s):  RAHNAMA A.A.*, MAKVANDI M.A.
 
* AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH EDUCATION & EXTENSION ORGANIZATION
 
Abstract: 
Sequential planting of wheat in salty farms of south Khuzestan cause to some limitations and reduce of yield. This experiment was done for initiate canola (Brassica napus. L) in common rotation of wheat-wheat, to increase efficacy in this farms in two years (2005, 2006) (2006, 2007) in one experimental farm with 9-11 mmohs/cm electrical conductivity in split plot experimental designe, based on randomize complete block with 7 planting dates, include from October 22 up to end of December 20, with once each 10 days delay in main plots and two canola cultivars include Hyola 401 and RGS003 in subplots with four replications. In through experiment, all of requirement data inclued, distance between planting and emergence, percent of emergence, beginning and ending of flowering, stem high, number of capsule per plant, number of seed per capsule, 1000 seed weight and seed yield were measured.
Data were analyzed by MSTAT-C software and Duncan test and graphs was drowen with Excel. Results showed that delay in planting cause to significant damages in yield and yield components. Yield of Hyola401 in all of planting dates was more than RGS003 and in November, their difference was more. Therefore, planting of Hyola401 in range of planting dates from October 22 up to November 20 increase yield more than 1 t/h, that according to good effects in rotation of canola-wheat, it is recomendable and has good economical condition. If Hyola401 is not available, planting of RGS003 in range of October 22 up to November 10 is recomendable.
 
Keyword(s): CANOLA, PLANTING DATE, SALTY FARM, ROTATION
 
References: 
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