Paper Information

Journal:   JOURNAL OF LARGE ANIMAL CLINICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH (JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE)   FALL 2007 , Volume 1 , Number 3; Page(s) 67 To 72.
 
Paper:  AN EPIDOMIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON THE INCIDENCE OF GUMBORO DISEASE AMONG THE BROILER CHICKENS IN ARDABIL PROVINCE DURING 2005-2007
 
Author(s):  AZIZPOUR A.*, FEYZI ZANGBAR ADEL
 
* POULTRY DISEASE DIVISION, VETERINARY MEDICINE OFFICE NEMIN, VET. MED HEAD PROVINCIE ARDABIL, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Gumboro disease is an acute viral disease that causes lesion in burs fabricius in chicks and accompanied by high mortality. Although immunization with vaccines is one of the main ways to control the mentioned disease, using the live strains of intermediate vaccine causes the failure in prevention of this disease. Being the significant subject, an Epidomiological Survey on The Incidence oF IBD and the effects of live and inactive vaccines to control of Gumboro disease in broiler farms of Ardabil province was assessed. For this reason, Ross, 308 strain10 brioler flocks were chosen in nearly same rearing conditions which were infected with Gumboro disease The clinical signs such as depression, white diarrhea, ruffled feather…, and macroscopic lesions such as the disease seen in the bursa, petechial hemorrhages muscles, nephrosis…were observed Blood samples were randomly collected from flocks and ELISA test was performed on serum samples. kind of vaccine, the mortality curve according to the daily number of dead birds and percent of mortality, and morbidity age in flocks were investigated The results of the research showed that the most outbreaks in broiler flocks are occurred when chicks are between 3 to 6 weeks old, and also percent of mortality in flocks which were received living and killed vaccines was lower than mortality percent of other flocks which only received the living vaccine.

 
Keyword(s): BROILER CHICKENS, GUMBORO DISEASE, BURSA FABRICIUS, NEPHROSIS, ARDABIL PROVINCE
 
References: 
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