Paper Information

Journal:   IRANIAN JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY   August 2001 , Volume 37 , Number 1-2; Page(s) 51 To 68.
 
Paper: 

BIOLOGY OF MAGNAPORTHE SALVINII THE CAUSAL AGENT OF RICE STEM ROT IN GUILAN PROVINCE, IRAN

 
 
Author(s):  JAVAN NIKKHAH M., HEJAROUD GH.A., SHARIFI TEHRANI A., ELAHINIA S.A.
 
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Abstract: 

The life cycle and survival of Magnaporthe salvinii, the causal agent of rice stem rot was investigated in Guilan province during 1994-95. The fungus infects the outer leaf sheaths of fully-grown rice transplants in the nurseries infested with sclerotia. Under field condition the fungus starts its activity at the tillering stage of plants in the middle of May or even shortly earlier. Floating sclerotia infect outer leaf sheaths at the water line. Then, the fungal mycelium infects inner leaf sheaths and stem. Under favorable condition, infected stems become rotten and necrotic and lodging occurs by wind and rain-fall. The fungus produces sclerotia in the stem and dried leaf sheaths at the end of growing season. It invedes the stem up to the third node but doesn*t infect foot and root of plant. Sclerotia are the most important means for survival of the fungus, both directly in the soil or in stem buried in the soil. They survived in both conditions for 8-10 months. Sclerotia germinated and produced appressorium on the inoculated plant tissue. Appressoria were olive-green and different in shape and size in vitro cultures. Perithecium formation was observed in dried leaf sheath at the end of the growing 8e.:1SonP.erithecia were also produced by crossing thirteen monoconidial isolates on stem debris and Sach*s agar medium under laboratory condition. About 50% of the trials produced perithecium. In (invitro) Perithecia developed 6-7 day post crossing single conidia and matured after 16days. Ascivanished after 25 days and ascospores were released into the ascocarp.

 
Keyword(s): RICE, MAGNAPORTHE SALVINII, STEM ROT, BIOLOGY
 
References: 
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