Paper Information

Journal:   ARCHIVES OF IRANIAN MEDICINE   July 2004 , Volume 7 , Number 3; Page(s) 195 To 200.
 
Paper: 

RISK ANALYSIS OF GROWTH FAILURE IN UNDER-5-YEAR CHILDREN

 
 
Author(s):  NOJOUMI MARZIEH*, TEHRANI A., NAJMABADI SH.
 
* Iran University of Medical Sciences
 
Abstract: 
Background – Growth failure in under-5-year children is a multidimensional phenomenon. Undernutrition in infancy and early childhood is thought to adversely affect cognitive development. A cross-sectional anthropometric survey was carried out in Karaj, Iran to measure the risk factors of wasting and stunting in under-5-year children.
Methods – From February to April 2002, 600 under-5-year children were selected by multistage random sampling. Household’s demographic and socioeconomic measures as well as child health and anthropometric characteristics were analyzed using Chi-square, t-test, ANOVA, and multiple logistic regression. To make a comparison with the results of National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), we used Epi Info 6 software. Our data collection methods were weighing by scales, observation, and checklist.
Results – The male to female ratio was one. The prevalence of underweight, stunting, and wasting was 13.9%, 20.3%, and 4.9%, respectively. Most malnourished children belonged to the mothers who had low literacy and no history of measles vaccination and breast-feeding. Data also indicated that the principal risk factors for underweight were birth weight below 2.5 kg, a shorter-than-3-year interval from mother’s previous birth, and urban life (p < 0.05).The principal risk factors for stunting were being younger than 6 months and birth weight below 2.5 kg (p < 0.05).
Conclusion – Our results support the biological and epidemiologic evidence that underweight, stunting, and wasting represent different processes of malnutrition and have different risk factors.
 
Keyword(s): ANTHROPOMETRY · MALNUTRITION · RISK FACTORS · STUNTING · WASTING
 
References: 
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