Paper Information

Journal:   IRANIAN JOURNAL OF RANGELANDS AND FORESTS PLANT BREEDING AND GENETIC RESEARCH   FALL 2007 , Volume 15 , Number 3 (29); Page(s) 183 To 195.
 
Paper: 

MUTAGENESIS EFFECTS OF EMS AND UV-C ERADIATION DOSES ON MEDICAGO SATIVA L

 
 
Author(s):  NADERI SHAHAB M.A.*, MEHRPOUR SH., JEBELI M., JAFARI ALI ASHRAF
 
* RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF FOREST AND RANGELANDS, TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Seeds of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were treated with various concentrations of Ethyl Methane Sulfonate (EMS) for 24 hours. The treated seeds were transferred onto 1/2 MS solid medium under aseptic condition. Germination percentage, shoot and root lengths and qualitative characteristics of the treated seedlings were evaluated. Low concentrations of EMS did not have adverse effects on seed germination. However, increase in concentration reduced the seed germination. At concentrations higher than 65mM EMS, germination as well as root and shoot growth were completely blocked. The inhibitory effect of EMS on root growth significantly was higher than on shoot growth. Seeds treated with 25 mM EMS were grown under hydroponics condition and phenotypic changes of plants were evaluated. Only one plant exhibited phenotypic changes among treated population. Although leaf color change observed in one of the treated plants, other abnormalities were not observed in the population. The effect of UV-C on germinated seeds was evaluated via irradiation of the germinated seeds with 254 nm wave length. At various doses of the UV light, however, phenotypic changes or inhibitory effects did not observe in the treated plants. In order to mutation induction in alfalfa, application of suitable concentrations of EMS gave the best results. However, irradiation of the germinated seeds with various doses of 254 nm UV beam, did not affect the germinated seeds of alfalfa.

 
Keyword(s): MUTATION, ETHYL METHANE SULFONATE (EMS), UV- C AND ALFALFA (MEDICAGO SATIVA L.)
 
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