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Paper Information

Journal:   ARCHIVES OF IRANIAN MEDICINE   MARCH 2008 , Volume 11 , Number 2; Page(s) 152 To 156.
 
Paper: 

RESPIRATORY RATE WITHIN THE FIRST HOUR OF ASCENT PREDICTS SUBSEQUENT ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS SEVERITY

 
DOI: 

08112/AIM.006

 
Author(s):  JAFARIAN S.*, GOROUHI F., GHERGHEREHCHI M., LOTFI J.
 
* DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY, SHARIATI HOSPITAL, NORTH KARGAR ST., TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

Background: Altitude illness results from hypobaric hypoxia at altitudes higher than 2500 meters above sea level. To determine whether vital signs can be used as predictors for severe acute mountain sickness, we carried out a prospective observational study.
Methods: A cohort of 90 individuals (male/female ratio: 2; age: 13 – 65 years) in a mountain hotel’s clinic at 3450 meters in Iran were studied from September through October 2006. Demographics and vital signs were measured during the first hour of ascent. The individuals were followed for acute mountain sickness symptoms including headache, dizziness, nausea or vomiting, insomnia, and fatigue. Lake Louise criteria were used to diagnose acute mountain sickness. Severe acute mountain sickness was considered if a score of equal or more than 5 was present. Significance was assigned to values of P<0.05.
Results: Acute mountain sickness was diagnosed in 34 (37.8%) participants after 24 hours of ascent. Severe acute mountain sickness was detected in 14 (15.6%) participants. A respiratory rate of 20 or more during the first hour of ascent was recorded for nine (64.3%) patients with severe acute mountain sickness and 15 (19.7%) individuals in the negative/mild acute mountain sickness group. This suggests an association between early high respiratory rates and risk of subsequent severe acute mountain sickness (P=0.001).
Conclusion: There is an association between a rise in the respiratory rate and susceptibility to acute mountain sickness. This can enable us to predict severe acute mountain sickness and prevent it. Furthermore, Tochal Mountain Hotel guests should be aware of the risk of acute mountain sickness and should be recommended to use prophylactic acetazolamide or dexamethasone before ascent.

 
Keyword(s): HEADACHE, INSOMNIA, MOUNTAIN SICKNESS, RESPIRATORY RATE
 
 
References: 
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Citations: 
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+ Click to Cite.
APA: Copy

JAFARIAN, S., & GOROUHI, F., & GHERGHEREHCHI, M., & LOTFI, J. (2008). RESPIRATORY RATE WITHIN THE FIRST HOUR OF ASCENT PREDICTS SUBSEQUENT ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS SEVERITY. ARCHIVES OF IRANIAN MEDICINE, 11(2), 152-156. https://www.sid.ir/en/journal/ViewPaper.aspx?id=103250



Vancouver: Copy

JAFARIAN S., GOROUHI F., GHERGHEREHCHI M., LOTFI J.. RESPIRATORY RATE WITHIN THE FIRST HOUR OF ASCENT PREDICTS SUBSEQUENT ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS SEVERITY. ARCHIVES OF IRANIAN MEDICINE. 2008 [cited 2021June21];11(2):152-156. Available from: https://www.sid.ir/en/journal/ViewPaper.aspx?id=103250



IEEE: Copy

JAFARIAN, S., GOROUHI, F., GHERGHEREHCHI, M., LOTFI, J., 2008. RESPIRATORY RATE WITHIN THE FIRST HOUR OF ASCENT PREDICTS SUBSEQUENT ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS SEVERITY. ARCHIVES OF IRANIAN MEDICINE, [online] 11(2), pp.152-156. Available: https://www.sid.ir/en/journal/ViewPaper.aspx?id=103250.



 
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