Paper Information

Journal:   JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES OF SHIRAZ UNIVERSITY   WINTER 2007 , Volume 25 , Number 4 (49); Page(s) 185 To 200.
 
Paper: 

EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF RESIDENCE AND GENDER ON COLLEGE STUDENT PERCEPTIONS AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

 
 
Author(s):  MASOUDI A., MOHAMMADI M.
 
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Abstract: 

This research examined the effects of on-campus residence versus commuter status on female and male Shiraz college students' academic performance, vocational commitment, self-efficacy, and perceptions of the college environment. The study sought to extend previous work examining the effects of college residence on student adjustment and academic performance by testing these effects with a national population that has received relatively little attention in the extant college student literature. We found positive effects of residential living on student adjustment and performance that were mediated by gender. Residential living had the greatest positive effects for women in the study. Specifically, female students living on campus demonstrated better vocational commitment, and better academic performance, than either commuter females or commuter males. Interestingly, regardless of these positive effects, females living on campus actually had poorer perceptions of the college environment than other students. By comparison, residence did not appear to have any significant effects at all on male students, vocational commitment, academic performance, or perception of the environment. Finally, although residence made no significance difference in female students, self-efficacy, males living on campus demonstrated greater self-efficacy than commuter males. Implications of these findings for college student development theory and higher education practice, and limitations of the study, are discussed.

 
Keyword(s): RESIDENCE, GENDER, VOCATIONAL COMMITMENT, STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS, SELF EFFICACY, STUDENTS’ PERFORMANCE
 
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