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Paper Information

Journal:   AVICENNA JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE (SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL OF HAMADAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES AND HEALTH SERVICES)   Fall 2002 , Volume 9 , Number 3 (SN 25); Page(s) 63 To 69.
 
Paper: 

FOUR CASES OF FOOD-BORNE BOTULISM IN A FAMILY

 
 
Author(s):  KERAMAT F.*
 
* Department of Communicable Diseases, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences & Health Services, Hamadan, Iran
 
Abstract: 

Botulism is caused by a neurotoxin produced from the anaerobic, Spore-forming bacterium clostridium botulinum. Botulism have four clinical forms: 1)Food -borne botulism 2)Wound botulism 3)Infant botulism 4)undetermined botulism, that the most common is food-borne botulism. Botulism in humans is usually caused by toxin types A, B, and E, that is a rare but serious disease. Botulism is characterized by symmetric, descending, flaccid paralysis of motor and autonomic nerves. Petosis, blurred vision, diplopia, dysphagia and dysarthria are common initial complaints. The diagnosis of food-borne botulism is based on clinical findings with the detection of toxin in patient,s stool, serum or detection of clostridium botulinum bacteria in the stool .
In this study four patients with food-borne botulism are discussed. The most common presentations of patients were weakness in exterimities, petosis, blurred vision, diplopia, and dysphagia. The patients had no fever and no sensory dysfunction. In three stool specimens of patients reported positive for toxin of botulinum.
All of the patients treated with trivalent equine antitoxin (ABE). The patients improved completely after 1.5 months of discharge. Conclusion: In any acute symmetric, descending, flaccid paralysis patient, we should think about botulism.

 
Keyword(s): BOTULISM, BOTULINUM ANTITOXIN, CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM, NEUROTOXINS
 
References: 
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