Click for new scientific resources and news about Corona[COVID-19]

Paper Information

Journal:   JOURNAL OF ANIMAL BIOLOGY   SPRING 2012 , Volume 4 , Number 3; Page(s) 21 To 32.
 
Paper: 

THE OVARIAN ANATOMY AND HISTOLOGY OF THE LIZARD, CYRTOPODION CASPIUM

 
 
Author(s):  HOJATI V.*, PARIVAR K., RASTEGAR POUYANI E., SHIRAVI A.
 
* DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY, SCIENCE AND RESEARCH BRANCH, ISLAMIC AZAD UNIVERSITY, TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

The Caspian bent-toed gecko, Cyrtopodion caspium, is one of the most common nocturnal lizards of Iran which consider to widespread distribution of it in the Northern provinces, no studies have been done on its reproduction. This research was done in order to the study of anatomy and histology of the ovaries of this species every 15 days in Sari County from May 5th to October 20th 2011. The ovaries of 70 mature specimens were histologically studied during 7 month. The results of this research show that females emerge in early April after hibernation and start their oogenesis and vitellogenesis in middle April. The ovaries are pair and vesicular and consist of 3 to 8 follicles with 0.32 to 4.99 mm diameter. The follicular layer is polymorphic and multilayer. The diameter of follicular layer is between 30 and 70 microns in mature and immature follicles and diameter of nucleus varies between 35 and 260 microns in immature and mature follicles, respectively. The nucleoli are very large and distinguishable from April to July and their numbers vary between 3 and 30 in immature and mature follicles respectively. The diameter of nucleolus is between 25 and 70 micron. The activity of nucleoli reduces after August and they disappear in nucleus. The mean diameter of tunica albuginea is 10 micron. The maximal activity of ovaries is in May and June. The oogenesis, vitellogenesis and oviposition of this species are completely stopped in early August.

 
Keyword(s): LIZARD, CYRTOPODION CASPIUM, ANATOMY, HISTOLOGY, OVARY
 
References: 
  • ندارد
 
  Persian Abstract Yearly Visit 84
 
Latest on Blog
Enter SID Blog