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Paper Information

Journal:   IRANIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING   WINTER 2013 , Volume 10 , Number 1; Page(s) 30 To 44.
 
Paper: 

ELECTRO-COALESCENCE OF AN AQUEOUS DROPLET AT AN OIL–WATER INTERFACE WITH AN INVESTIGATION OF SECONDARY DROPLETS FORMATION

 
 
Author(s):  MOUSAVI S.H., SHARIATY NIASAR M.*, BAHMANYAR H., MOOSAVIAN M.A.
 
* SCHOOL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF TEHRAN, 11365-4563 TEHRAN, IRAN
 
Abstract: 

The coalescence of water droplets in oils may be enhanced by application of an electric field. This approach is commonly used in the crude oil and petroleum industry to separate water from crude oil extracted from oil well. By application of an electric field two patterns of drop-interface coalescence may occur: complete coalescence and partial coalescence. The former is obviously the desirable pattern for industrial coalescers. However in practice, the process of coalescence could actually produce smaller droplets which become more difficult to remove, and hence undesirable. This is caused by either necking, due to extensive elongation of the droplet, or reaction to a fast and energetic coalescence and is referred to as partial coalescence. The volume of the droplets formed in this way has been analyzed as a function of the initial droplet size, electric field strength and change in interface tension between two phases as a result of surface active agents. There is a considerable growth in secondary droplets volume. Expansion speed of the neck connecting the droplet and interface at the beginning of the pumping process has also been quantified and partial coalescence has been explained as a result of competition between pumping and necking processes. These results are useful in optimizing the electro-coalescence process.

 
Keyword(s): COALESCENCE, ELECTRIC FIELD, ELECTRO-COALESCER, INTERFACIAL TENSION, PUMPING PROCESS
 
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